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Monday, January 5, 2015

Raider-Waite from an article by Hunter Oatman-Stanford

Image source - http://www.collectorsweekly.com/articles/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/1920PamC-edited-1024x760.jpg


Below is an excerpt of a well-researched and written article about tarot cards. The author has the following to say about Raider-Waite:

Even if you aren’t familiar with tarot-card reading, you’ve likely seen one of the common decks, like the famous Rider-Waite, which has been continually printed since 1909. Named for publisher William Rider and popular mystic A.E. Waite, who commissioned Pamela Colman Smith to illustrate the deck, the Rider-Waite helped bring about the rise of 20th-century occult tarot used by mystical readers.
“The Rider-Waite deck was designed for divination and included a book written by Waite in which he explained much of the esoteric meaning behind the imagery,” says Wolf. “People say its revolutionary point of genius is that the pip cards are ‘illustrated,’ meaning that Colman Smith incorporated the number of suit signs into little scenes, and when taken together, they tell a story in pictures. This strong narrative element gives readers something to latch onto, in that it is relatively intuitive to look at a combination of cards and derive your own story from them.
“The deck really took off in popularity when Stuart Kaplan obtained the publishing rights and developed an audience for it in the early ’70s,” says Wolf. Kaplan helped renew interest in card reading with his 1977 book, Tarot Cards for Fun and Fortune Telling, and has since written several volumes on tarot.

Tarot Mythology: The Surprising Origins of the World's Most Misunderstood Cards
By Hunter Oatman-Stanford — June 18th, 2014